Milken Future of Health Summit

Future of Health Summit: Reimagining Senior Housing and Integrated Care

As the baby boom generation ages, expanding affordable housing and integrated long-term care options for our nation’s diverse older adult population has become increasingly urgent.

According to a National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care-funded study conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago, more than half of middle-income Americans aged 75 or older will not have the financial resources to access housing and care by 2029. Meeting the needs of this “Forgotten Middle”—an income group too wealthy to qualify for means-tested programs yet unable to afford private-pay senior living options—will require coordination from public and private sector stakeholders.

Recognizing the challenges of promoting and incentivizing innovation across sectors, this session hosted by the Milken Institute features industry leaders, providers, and policy experts discussing scalable housing and care solutions for this growing segment of the population.

Moderator:

  • Caitlin MacLean, Senior Director, Innovative Finance, Milken Institute

Speakers:

  • Lynne Katzmann, President and CEO, Juniper Communities
  • Bob Kramer, Co-Founder and Strategic Advisor, National Investment Center; Founder and Fellow, Nexus Insights
  • Nirav Shah, Senior Scholar, Stanford University
  • Elizabeth White, Founder, NUUage Coliving

Watch the recording: https://milkeninstitute.org/panel/14999/reimagining-senior-housing-and-integrated-care

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NIC Awards $3M to Milken Institute to Establish Groundbreaking Aging Innovation Collaborative

NIC Awards $3M to Milken Institute to Establish Groundbreaking Aging Innovation Collaborative

New Collaborative will reimagine aging, leveraging nationally renowned experts from different economic sectors to collaborate to improve the lives of older adults.

The National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care (NIC) awarded the Santa Monica, Calif.-based Milken Institute $3 million to establish the Aging Innovation Collaborative (AIC) within the Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging, which advances healthy longevity and financial security through policy, research, convenings, and multisector partnerships.

As part of the creation of the AIC, Nexus Insights will share intellectual and human capital with AIC, and merge with the new collaborative. Its fellows — including its founder, NIC strategic advisor Bob Kramer — will contribute to its day-to-day work, becoming AIC fellows.

The AIC will engage experts to develop bold new models of housing, healthcare, and community that meet the needs of a growing U.S. population of older adults. By removing silos between industries and incorporating innovations in housing, healthcare, technology, and more, the AIC will identify and scale comprehensive solutions that improve the lives of older adults.

“Housing and long-term care stand at a crossroads as millions of Baby Boomers think about how they want to live their best life after retirement,” said Raymond Braun, president and CEO of NIC. “This commitment to the Milken Institute brings talented individuals from diverse backgrounds together to transform how we think about aging in the United States. The Aging Innovation Collaborative will become a font of ideas for consumer advocates, real estate developers, senior housing operators, healthcare providers and payers, policymakers, and others.”

The AIC will initially focus on three core offerings:

  • A Landmark Tracking Study. This research study will track attitudes and preferences of older adults aged 50-80 over time. It will be conducted in collaboration with a nationally recognized research partner and leading experts in the field. Initial results are expected in 2024.
  • Aging Innovation Council. This advisory council will include leaders from consumer goods and retailers, housing, government, healthcare providers and payers, technology, and capital markets. By removing silos across industries to share ideas and technologies, the Council will create new housing, healthcare, and community solutions for the aging population.
  • Advisory Services. The AIC will provide advisory services to organizations wanting to enhance the health and housing of older adults but that lack the capacity or expertise for innovative solutions. Advisors will help companies navigate the complexities of the aging sector, identify opportunities for innovation, and accelerate time to market.

“It’s an exciting time to join forces with the Milken Institute to help people meet their expectations for aging,” said Kramer. “Older adults have diverse backgrounds, interests, healthcare, and social needs, and they want and expect housing and care that is as unique as they are. Aging is a good thing, and we need disruptive innovation to create housing and care that supports older adults’ ability to not just age but thrive.”

“I am honored to work with NIC in the establishment of the AIC at the Milken Institute,” said Diane Ty, senior director of the Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging. “I look forward to bringing in outside entrepreneurial experience to lead the AIC and examine the intersection of sectors to create new solutions and platforms that benefit older adults. The Milken Institute’s core maxim is ‘turning ideas into action,’ and that is exactly what the AIC plans to do.”

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Longevity expert Ryan Frederick

Longevity Expert Ryan Frederick

Ryan Frederick, Founder & CEO of Here and a Nexus Fellow, is an internationally recognized thought leader, speaker, author, innovator, developer, and strategy consultant specializing in the intersection of place and healthy longevity. He has educated tens of thousands of consumers through keynote talks, workshops, videos, blogs, online assessments and his book, Right Place, Right Time.

Healthy longevity is challenging in modern times. We are less likely to have a support team in close proximity.

“We have more people living longer without this infrastructure or support of extended families. People are having fewer kids, and those kids are less likely to be geographically approximate to where they are.”

Living longer better is more than just genetics. Where you live matters significantly.

“We need to find a way to successfully age. Your genetics only account for 30% of your longevity. It’s more about those social determinants of health we hear about. It’s lifestyle, it’s environment, it’s social connection, it’s physical wellbeing, it’s financial wellbeing, it’s being engaged in your community.”

Ryan has worked with Johns Hopkins University, Stanford University, AARP, LeadingAge, and more, and has been featured on CBS News, Forbes, The Washington Post and more. If you’d like to learn more about Ryan, visit Here.

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Group of Senior Friends

8 Reasons to Be Optimistic About the Fight Against Ageism

American popular culture worships youth, and our governmental policies aimed at supporting older adults are far from perfect. But there’s still good news when it comes to society’s attitudes toward aging. We asked Nexus Insights Fellows to name one reason to be encouraged about the fight against ageism in the U.S.

8 Reasons to Be Optimistic About the Fight Against Ageism

  1. “I am encouraged that ageism is now part of the national conversation. That wasn’t the case even five or ten years ago. Now we see universities including ageism in their aging services curriculum, multiple books being published on the topic, and even female celebrities embracing their gray hair and aging process. We have a long way to go in driving real change, but awareness is the first step.” – Jill Vitale-Aussem
  2. “Aging is one of the most unifying human experiences we have. I find hope in the elevated value of intergenerational engagement: the parent who returns to a new career after raising their children and is embraced by the team; the college student who chooses to live in a senior living apartment instead of the dorms. We have more opportunities now than ever to engage with people of all ages.” – Sarah Thomas
  3. “As young people are becoming increasingly aware of the probability of longer lives — century-long lives in some cases — more young people are seeing the ways in which our society needs to be redesigned to help them thrive over their life course. In such cases, these young people are acting in their self-interest but to the betterment of society more broadly.” – Ryan Frederick
  4. “I love what Julia Louis-Dreyfus has been doing to uplift aging. Brava!” – Jacquelyn Kung, PhD
  5. “Following the pandemic, I am encouraged by the interest in taking on challenges related to older adults that we have ignored for decades.” – David Grabowski, PhD
  6. “A decade ago at a White House Correspondents dinner, actress Helen Mirren lamented to me that there were no good roles for women over 50 in Hollywood. It’s been heartening to see a proliferation of smart, savvy films and TV shows featuring people over 50. Maybe Hollywood can save D.C. and do a film about a smart, savvy older politician?” – Jay Newton-Small
  7. “What I find encouraging today is that people of all ages are speaking out about ageism; not just older people. It’s that intergenerational effort that will ultimately extinguish ageism in our culture.” – Sara Zeff Geber, PhD
  8. “I am encouraged whenever I see people admit and own their age. That act helps others recognize that the person speaking is much more than a number (age).” – Dr. Bill Thomas

We also asked our Fellows to name what they think is the most damaging example of ageism in the U.S.

8 Ways Ageism Damages Our Society

  1. “Most damaging to the fight against ageism is our language. Our language reflects how we think, so when we can extinguish terms like ‘little old lady,’ ‘geezer,’ ‘over the hill,’ and ‘granny,’ we will have made a worthy start on changing the images people hold in their minds about older adults.” – Sara Zeff Geber, PhD
  2. “Ageism leads many to believe that caring for older adults is not everyone’s responsibility. Caregiving will always be a family issue, but it is also a policy issue. We should prioritize policies that improve housing, long-term care, and health care for older adults.” – David Grabowski, PhD
  3. “The most damaging example is the assumption that as we age, we have nothing left to contribute to our communities and society. The term ‘silver tsunami,’ for example, frames our growing cohort of older adults as a disaster, assuming that older people are nothing more than a drain on society. This messaging seeps into the minds of policy makers, aging services providers, and each of us as aging human beings.” – Jill Vitale-Aussem
  4. “Equating aging with decline creates a perverse, self-fulfilling prophecy that cuts older people off from their full developmental potential.” – Dr. Bill Thomas
  5. “I believe that the weaponization of age — particularly accusations of cognitive impairment as political cudgels — was incredibly damaging and stigmatizing for anyone grappling with that diagnosis.” – Jay Newton-Small
  6. “Ageism has limited our ability to design places — from metropolitan areas to neighborhood blocks to housing — that are welcoming and inclusive to people of all ages and abilities. The result is that there are fewer intergenerational relationships and older people may need to move away from their ‘home.’” – Ryan Frederick
  7. “Aging is not a disease. All too often we succumb to society’s ageist pressures to attempt to halt or reverse the aging process. The anti-aging movement that applies unnatural filters to every photo we take and pushes a definition of beauty that revolts against nature is dangerous. This unhealthy view of aging begins to damage society in our youth and we carry the burden of these unhealthy pressures for decades.” – Sarah Thomas
  8. “When I hear older adults described as ‘cute,’ I cringe.” – Jaquelyn Kung, PhD

 

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ATI Advisory Launches New State Resource Center

ATI Advisory has launched a new State Resource Center which supports states in their efforts across Medicaid, Medicare, long-term services and supports (LTSS), behavioral health, and health-related social needs (HRSN).

“I am grateful to the talented team at ATI that makes this possible,” said ATI Advisory CEO, and Nexus Fellow, Anne Tumlinson, in a LinkedIn post announcing the new center.

Current resources include: tips sheets focusing on Medicare-Medicaid Plan (MMPT) transitions, key programs serving dual eligible individuals, and state approaches to increased home and community-based service (HCBS) provider capacity.

ATI Advisory will continue to add tools, data, and tip sheets to the State Resource Center in the coming months.

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Ryan Fredericks launches Here to Embrace the Role of ‘Place’ in Healthy Longevity

Here is Finally Here: Ryan Frederick’s Organization, Here, Embraces the Role of ‘Place’ in Healthy Longevity

Did you know that life expectancy in 1900 was only 50 years old? In 2050, it’s expected to rise to 94. What contributes to this increased longevity? It’s not just better genes. In fact, only 20% of longevity is attributed to genetics. The remaining 80% is linked to lifestyle and environment.

Ryan Frederick, a Nexus Fellow, is a nationally recognized thought leader in the intersection of place and healthy longevity. He’s putting the spotlight on the fundamental role of where people live to optimize the odds of a long, healthy and financially secure life. In 2021, he authored the acclaimed book, Right Place, Right Time (Johns Hopkins University Press).

“Where you live and how you choose to engage where you live is one of the most important decisions in life,” says Frederick. “If you are concerned about living a long, healthy and financially secure life, start with finding your right place and good things will follow.”

With the acceptance of remote work, climate change risk and political polarization, finding the right place to live and thrive has never been more important and more urgent. This has been an impetus for Frederick to rebrand and rename his organization (SmartLiving 360) as ‘Here’, in order to better fit the company’s goals and mission. Here is a platform that provides consumer tools for individuals of all ages to make better informed decisions about the role of place. In addition, Here consults with leading real estate, finance and health entities focused on creating better places for people to thrive.

Frederick envisions that Here will help spark a movement that makes place equally foundational to an individual’s longevity as healthy eating, exercise and financial planning.

Are you in the right place for a healthy, long, fulfilling life? Get your results by taking “The Right Place, Right Time” assessment at here.life/assessment.

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Future of Aging

If You Hated 2020, You’re Going to Despise Old Age: A Nexus Op-Ed

It’s safe to say that none of us want to experience life as it was lived in 2020 ever again.

We missed our friends and family during the era of “social distancing.” In the short term, most of us could handle the loneliness. But as the pandemic wore on, we found that Zoom meetings and virtual happy hours, at first novel and fun, were a very poor substitute for authentic human connection and became tiresome and annoying. We grew frustrated with the monotony of a limited life. Netflix binges, family game nights and jigsaw puzzles eventually lost their appeal.

Most of us are tired of rehashing what life was like during pandemic lockdowns, but there are important lessons to be learned. Sadly, not everyone has the option for a life filled with purpose, autonomy, and variety. What we experienced during 2020 is the life many older adults living alone in their homes or institutional care settings experience every day – both before and after the pandemic. COVID lockdowns gave younger Americans an unpleasant taste of the “medicine” that millions of elders swallow every day.

We learned lessons during the height of COVID that we can — and should — apply to older Americans. The time is now!

What would it take to have older people live where they wish without becoming socially isolated? What would it take for older people to be viewed as valuable members of a society that desperately needs their lived experiences and knowledge? What would it take for those receiving care in congregate settings to have lives filled with purpose, meaningful relationships, and, dare we say it, joy?

Read the full article, If You Hated 2020, You’re Going to Despise Old Age, authored by Nexus Insights’ Fellows Jill Vitale-Aussem, Caroline Pearson, and Dr. Bill Thomas, on LinkedIn, and join the #NexusVoices conversation.

What do you think we have learned? How can we improve the future of aging in America?

About the Authors

Jill Vitale-Aussem, President & CEO of Christian Living Communities, and Nexus Fellow, has over two decades of boots-on-the-ground senior living leadership experience, transforming organizations by creating age-positive, ability-inclusive community cultures of growth, belonging and purpose.

Caroline Pearson’s deep understanding of public and private health insurance informs new financing models that leverage healthcare dollars to fund non-medical support for older adults. Caroline is the Executive Director of The Peterson Center on Healthcare, and a Nexus Fellow.

Dr. Bill Thomas, Nexus Fellow, founder of The Eden Alternative, The Green House Project and Minka is a serial creator of scalable models and an innovator in the field of housing and services for older people. He brings to Nexus his belief that people, properly equipped and prepared, can solve the most difficult problems of living.

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solo aging

Nexus Fellow Sara Zeff Geber Shares Solo Aging Expertise this Spring

Solo aging and retirement expert, Nexus Fellow Dr. Sara Zeff Geber, has been drawing attention to the challenges of aging alone, and urging aging services to address these challenges, for over a decade. With the recent demand for Dr. Geber’s expertise on the subject, it sounds like organizations across the United States are finally starting to listen.

And they should. The statistics show it’s past time to start thinking about solo agers. According to a Forbes.com piece authored by Geber, “Twelve million adults over age 65 live alone. That is 27% of the population–the highest rate in the world. The majority are women. By age 75, the rate of women living alone rises to 44%. With the mobility in today’s society, many family members live far away. Among boomer women, 19.4% never gave birth, so there are no children or grandchildren at all to pick up the mantle of caregiving. These numbers are very different from those of preceding generations.”

If we don’t address the needs of this sizable population, we’re in trouble. Who’s going to help them coordinate care? How will they combat the risk of loneliness and find community and purpose?

Dr. Geber wrote, “Essential Retirement Planning for Solo Agers: A Retirement and Aging Roadmap for Single and Childless Adults,” which was selected as a “best book on aging well” by the Wall Street Journal in 2018.

If you want to learn more from Geber, the pioneer who coined the term “solo ager,” check out her upcoming speaking events below:

Upcoming Events

Meeting the Challenges of Solo Aging with Sara Zeff Geber – Acacia Creek

April 13, 2023 – Union City, CA

Learn the best tips and tricks on solo aging at the Acacia Creek Retirement Community

  • Planning for a life with meaning and fun after 65
  • Building community later in life
  • How to meet the challenges of aging

It’s Past Time to Think About Solo Agers – 2023 LeadingAge Leadership Summit

April 18, 2023 – Washington, D.C.

Hear from the expert who wrote the seminal book on solo aging, along with a panel of diverse providers and older consumers on how your organization can empower solo adults aging alone to make decisions about their future and thrive while aging solo.

The Panel

  • Sara Zeff Geber, Consultant & Educator
  • Stephanie Chong, Executive Director, Northwest Neighbors Village
  • Karen Zuckerstein, Member, Northwest Neighbors Village
  • Kera Wooten, Executive Director, Westminster at Lake Ridge
  • Jacqueline Evans, Resident, Westminster at Lake Ridge

Solo Agers Are Knocking at Your Door – Leading Age California Annual Conference

May 2, 2023 – Monterey, CA

Solo Agers, adults over 60 who have no children or are aging without family support, will need a community around them as they age. As Solo Agers begin to recognize this need, life plan Communities and other continuing care residential options will look appealing, but will those communities be ready to serve them in a way that supports who they are and who they have been?

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NIC spring conference 2023 - Partnering for the Future

Nexus Insights Convene for the NIC Spring Conference

Nexus Insights will be joining senior housing and aging service leaders in San Diego on March 1st for the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care (NIC) Spring Conference. Conference sessions will discuss new opportunities that provide better outcomes of care for older adults through more effective integration of healthcare services and senior housing. Anyone in healthcare or senior housing looking to connect, develop long-range strategic partnerships, and innovate new models of care and housing on behalf of older adults should plan to attend.

“Integrating healthcare services with housing is mission critical for a new generation of senior living,” said Anne Tumlinson, founder and CEO of ATI Advisory, and a Nexus Fellow. “It means better care and quality of life for residents, and rewards operators and investors for addressing healthcare spending.”

Several Nexus Fellows are attending the conference including Bob Kramer, Anne Tumlinson, and Sarah Thomas. Nexus friend and alumna, Kelsey Mellard of Sitka, is speaking on one panel and interviewing Dr. Sachin Jain at the Friday morning keynote session.

Want to attend? Visit springconference.nic.org for more information. Already going and want to meet? Ping us or reach out directly to our Fellows.

Nexus Picks

Sessions you won’t want to miss at the 2023 NIC Spring Conference:

Emerging Value Based Care Opportunities for Seniors Housing & LTC Operators
Wednesday, March 1, 2023 | 4:30pm
Speakers:
Anne Tumlinson, Founder & CEO, ATI Advisory
Grant Severson, Vice President, Optum Senior Community Care
James Lydiard, Chief Strategy Officer, HarmonyCares
Brian Cloch, CEO, Cloch Management
Chris Dawe, Acting President, Curana Health Medical Group
Laurie Schultz, Principal & Co-Founder, Avenue

Taking Your Show on The Road: Bridging Care Gaps by Extending Services Into the Community
Thursday, March 2, 2023 | 1:00pm
Speakers:
Kelsey Mellard, CEO, Sitka
Michael Kurliand, Clinical Quality and Integration, MedWand
Peter Longo, Principal & Managing Partner, Cantex

The Trends and Opportunities in Medicare all Types of Operators Should Be Tracking
Friday, March 2, 2023 | 8:30am
Speakers:
Kurt Read, Partner, RSF Partners
Kelsey Mellard, CEO, Sitka
Dr. Sachin H. Jain, MD, MBA, FACP, President & CEO, SCAN Group and Health Plan

 

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Innovation Challenges in the Aging Services

What Makes Innovation Challenging in the Aging Services Industry?

This week we are proud to highlight Nexus Fellow and industry expert, Jay Newton-Small.

In this Nexus video clip, she describes the unique challenges of the aging services industry and why it’s so difficult and complicated to innovate and make a meaningful impact.

“It’s such an inefficient industry and it’s so highly regulated. It’s a very intractable system that requires patience in innovating and ingenuity in innovating that other industries don’t require.”

Challenges for startups coming into the aging services space include selling into healthcare organizations that are under intense pressure due to rampant staffing shortages that have left them in a sustained state of crisis and placed a huge financial burden on them to maintain operations and meet basic regulations. The environment has been one of extreme stress, with little bandwidth or budget to invest in innovation or quality initiatives.

Information security protocols and other legal standards required to access patient data, while critical for protecting patient privacy, are also hard for small companies to meet on limited runways. And current fee-for-service payment models leave little room for innovation in holistic, person-centered care innovations.

“From the get-go, this is regulated in a really intense way, and there’s no way around that. So you have to think through, what is a way that we can innovate here that we can be able to have an impact, but also not harm people, which is a super important thing about health care. And also how can you find a way to make a profit and make your company viable. It’s one of the most challenging areas to innovate in.”

Newton-Small is the CEO of PlanAllies and the CEO and founder of MemoryWell, a tech-enabled patient engagement platform and SaaS that uses Natural Language Processing and “conversational interactions” proven to engage seniors and help Medicare Advantage plans lower churn. Unlike chatbots, MemoryWell uses journalists—or can train callers to interview like journalists using their proprietary software— to create real, effective dialogue with older Americans.

 

As a national journalist, Jay Newton-Small brings a unique perspective to the field of aging, insight into politics and policy, and a media platform. She also brings the heart of a personal-lived experience that led her to found her company, MemoryWell.

 

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